STN Urges Citizens to Celebrate World Blood Donor Day by Giving Blood Locally

June 14, 2016

Contact: Cody Jones
cjones@traumanurses.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Society of Trauma Nurses Urges Citizens to Celebrate World Blood Donor Day by Giving Blood Locally

Lexington, Ky.—The Society of Trauma Nurses (STN) urges citizens in the U.S. and around the world to celebrate World Blood Donor Day by giving blood in their local communities.

According to the
World Health Organization (WHO), regular voluntary unpaid blood donors are the foundation of a safe blood supply because they are associated with low levels of infection that can be transmitted by transfusions, including HIV and hepatitis viruses. Blood can be used whole, or separated into its component parts, such as red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and other “substances” that can be used to treat a wide range of diseases. A single unit of blood can be used to benefit several patients.

 “Every two seconds someone requires a blood transfusion,” said STN President, Joan Pirrung, MSN, RN, ACNS-BC, “and 40,000 pints of blood are required every day in the U.S. alone to keep up with demand. The tragic mass shooting in Orlando this past weekend illustrates the importance of making local blood donations within your community to fortify this critical life-saving resource.”

STN urges citizens to make a commitment to donate blood on a regular basis to help meet ongoing needs and unexpected disasters close to home. Frequent volunteer blood donors ensure that blood is ready (collected and tested) and available year-round whenever and wherever it is needed.

Trauma victims are but one component of those who require blood on a regular basis. Patients who require the most transfusions include those:
  • being treated for cancer
  • undergoing orthopedic surgeries
  • undergoing organ and marrow transplants
  • undergoing cardiovascular surgeries
  • being treated for inherited blood disorders
Transfusions of blood and blood products helps save millions of lives every year, including during emergencies such as conflicts, natural disasters, and childbirth. It can help patients suffering from life-threatening conditions live longer and with higher quality of life, and supports complex medical and surgical procedures.
 
About STN
The Society of Trauma Nurses is a professional nonprofit organization whose mission is to ensure optimal trauma care to all people globally through initiatives focused on trauma nurses related to prevention, education and collaboration with other healthcare disciplines. STN advocates for the highest level of quality trauma care across the continuum. We accomplish this through an environment that fosters visionary leadership, mentoring, innovation and interdisciplinary collaboration in the delivery of trauma care. For more information, visit
www.traumanurses.org.